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As we near the end of another busy year, here’s a fun look back at the water quality testing and volunteer work you empowered!  You can help make sure Charleston Waterkeeper’s boots stay on the water working for you! If you’re able, make a contribution today: CharlestonWaterkeeper.org/give.

So, how did we do in 2021?

We completed the 9th season of our weekly bacteria testing this year! We collected and analyzed a total of 482 samples and produced 25 water quality reports to keep you and your family safe in the water.

It’s important to pay attention: 41% of our samples failed to meet the standard for safe swimming. That’s a little bit higher than previous years. But, we added 5 new testing sites this year including Northbridge Park, Sol Legare, Clark Sound, Filbin Creek, and the Wando River.

Filbin Creek stood out as a contender for the worst water quality. It only rated safe for swimming one time this season. The Wando River at the Daniel Island Children’s Park did really well and only showed high levels of bacteria one time. Next season make sure you stay up-to-date with the data so you know when and where it’s safe to swim!

It’s not all about bacteria! Our team of Creek Watchers were out every month testing water quality at 25 sites in your local rivers and creeks. This year they performed 966 water quality tests for parameters like temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen to help keep an eye on the health of your local waterways.

Charleston Waterkeeper volunteers don’t just test water quality, they clean up creeks, build oyster reefs, and help with outreach at local events. They really do power the fight for clean water! So far this year we’ve organized 16 cleanups and 31 marsh restoration events. Volunteers just like you removed more than 4.7 tons of debris from your local waterways and planted 10,629 cordgrass stalks in the marsh.

We also added several new volunteer events this year like fish sampling and greenhouse cleanups with our friends at DNR SCORE to provide fun news ways to get involved in the fight for clean water. Overall, 1,000 volunteers participated in stewardship work to protect and restore your waterways donating more than 2,100 hours of service.

What a year! And, there’s still more to be done. Help make sure Charleston Waterkeeper’s boots stay on the water working for you! If you’re able, make a contribution today.

Sincerely,

Cheryl Carmack
Staff Scientist & Volunteer Coordinator